Monthly Archives: May 2014

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Spotlight: Dr. Lord & Dr. Domson

 

We’d like to take the opportunity to spotlight two of our amazing radiologists, Dr. Lord & Dr. Domson

 

 

Dr. Lord graduated from the University of South Florida College of Medicine, and has been in practice for 19 years. He specializes in Radiology, and is certified by the American Board of Radiology and the National Board of Medical Examiners. He has his medical license in 5 states including MS, NE, NM, CO, and FL.

 

Dr.Lord is a sub-specialist radiologist with expertise in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cardiac, and Musculoskeletal Imaging. His dedication to his patients is is seen in his quick turn-around times and special attention he pays to each and every patient, providing the highest quality of patient care.

 

 

Dr. Domson graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and completed his residency in Radiology at the University of South Florida. He has been in practice for 19 years, and is licensed to practice in NE, NM, CO, FL, and GA.

 

He specializes in Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Imaging, and is certified by both the American Board of Radiology and the Florida Board of Medicine. Dr. Domson is extremely dedicated to his patients and aims to provide as much specialized care as he can provide to every patient that he sees.

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Nurses Week is May 6-12!

National Nurses Day is celebrated annually on May 6 to raise awareness of the important role nurses play in society. It marks the beginning of National Nurses Week, which ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale.

We celebrate all nurses at Open MRI of Pueblo!

 

So, this week, we wanted to highlight a day in the life of a registered nurse to show everything they do! Thanks to Yahoo! Education, we could follow a day with 55-year-old Annette Staack, cardiac liaison and cardiac procedure nurse.

  • 6:45am: Check outpatient bookings so she’s prepared for the day.
  • 7:00am: Check inpatient tests schedule so she can alert the doctors involved.
  • 7:45am: Fax premed orders, set up equipment, call to remind patients of appointments.
  • 8:15am: Run an EKG dobutamine stress echo test on a patient.
  • 8:45am: Call for Armenian translator for a patient. Check vitals.
  • 9:00am: Obtain sedation IV medicines and wait for doctor.
  • 9:15am: Look at the patient’s heart with doctor, use images taken during a five-to-seven minute period.
  • 9:45am: Check patient’s vitals as they wake up and create digital and written report.
  • 10:15am: Check in on a coronary bypass surgery and deliver updates to the family.
  • 10:45am: Head to office for some yogurt but gets called in for an EKG.
  • 11:15am: Gets called for urgent electrocardioversion while on the way to another patient.
  • 11:45am: Greet and begin procedure with EKG patient.
  • 12:30pm: Doctor arrives.
  • 12:45pm: Returns patient to outpatient unit and offer report.
  • 1:15pm: Check in on surgery patient again and update the family.
  • 1:45pm: Start to have lunch but gets interrupted by another EKG. Complete three back-to-back-to-back Lexiscan stress heart tests.
  • 2:30pm: Finish cold lunch.
  • 3:00pm: Prepare a patient for a coronary bypass surgery the next day with Spanish translator.
  • 4:00pm: Check for emails.
  • 4:15pm: Check on heart surgery patient in the ICU recovery and record 14 pages of data.
  • 4:45pm: Final check of work emails.
  • 5:00pm: Check tomorrow’s schedule.
  • 5:15pm: “I am out of here. Tired but fulfilled!”

Say thank you to a nurse in your life. You can read Annette’s full article here.

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Want a Health Crystal Ball? Stand on One Leg

A sign of good health for 53-year-olds can be found by…

  • Men balancing on one leg for more than 10 seconds
  • Men standing up and sitting down in a chair more than 37 times in a minute
  • Women standing on one leg for more than 10 seconds
  • Women standing up and sitting down in a chair more than 35 times in a minute

These abilities were comparable with better overall health than those who performed poorly.

“Everyday tasks such as getting out of a chair without help have previously been used as an early warning sign of ill health in elderly people but the new study shows they can be used to predict health problems in people aged as young as 53.”

These simple indicators can create the foundation for early screening tests for people who may need to make lifestyle changes to start taking medication.

 

What the study found:

  • Men who could only stand and sit 23 times in a minute or less were twice as likely to die within 13 years than those who achieved the goals of the screening
  • Women who could only stand and sit 22 times in a minute or less were twice as likely to die within 13 years than those who achieved the goals of the screening
  • Those individuals unable to complete this test at all were nearly seven times more likely to die within 13 years than those who could participate
  • Men and women alike who could only stand on one leg for 2 seconds or less were three times more likely to die within 13 years than those who could reach the ten second mark
  • Those individuals unable to complete this test at all were nearly twelve times more likely to die within 13 years than those who could

The study used 5,000 participants born in 1946, making them all 53. Nurses visited their homes to complete the tests, and then their health was tracked.

Lead author, Dr. Rachel Cooper with the Medical Research Council, said, “The majority of these studies are done in older people but we have shown that even in this younger age group, where you would not expect pre-existing disease, we are still seeing these measures are picking up some underlying ageing and disease process.”

Since disability is defined as “having problems with everyday activities such as walking across a room, dressing, bathing, eating, using the lavatory…” etc., it makes sense why these simple tasks can be a good indication.

To read the full article, including information on a secondary study, click here.